The First Forty Days~ Practice Stillness

Rediscover who you are in the postpartum stillness

We are constantly on the move. Solving problems, meeting challenges, reaching goals, perhaps even running a small business and shouting the mantra #hustleharder! When you are in those first few weeks there is no greater struggle I see as a postpartum doula than the shift of mindset from constant movement in the mind, heart, and body to the slow living the 4th trimester deserves. Your whole being was poured out in the birthing of your little one. To quote a very common phrase, you can’t pour from an empty cup. To make the mind shift, it will take practice and pregnancy is the best time to practice stilling your mind.

If you’d like to learn more about postpartum support and how I can help you transition into motherhood, please email me at Dee@ebbandflowbirth.com.

If you’re not in the area but are looking for support I have a beta online cohort if you will that will take you through postpartum challenges and holistic practices to heal your best. The program is called Nourished Mother Collective. Live weekly group calls and exclusive membership for 12-months. Feel free to email if you’d like to learn more.

Online postpartum education and virtual postpartum support circle

The First Forty Days ~ Feed & Be Fed

Plan for your postpartum

When we look at a portrait of postpartum and what the ideal is, it is simple. Yet it is hard. Feeding your baby does not always come naturally, breastfeeding is not always desired and you may face challenges with bottle feeding, tongue ties, lip ties, or premature birth pose challenges. Being fed well as a new mother sounds easy enough but we don’t always have family near by to help, or your new to the area you birthed in. The last thing you should be doing is cooking three meals a day and washing dishes etc. What can you do to meet the challenges as they arise? Plan, gather support, local professionals and resources,and learn all you can about the challenges before your baby arrives. If you’d like help in your 4th trimester email me for more information. dee@ebbandflowbirth.com #planyourpostpartum #postpartummatters #nourishedmotherscollective #postpartumeducation #firstfortydays #newbornmother #findyourhelpers

Anemia + Pregnancy

Anemia

 

By Deidre M. Medina, LMT, CBE

What is anemia?

There are a few kinds of anemia in pregnancy.

Pregnancy-related anemia when your blood has too few red blood cells which in this kind of anemia is due to the increased blood volume during pregnancy.

Iron deficiency is due to mother not having enough red blood cells stores to match the babies use of the mother’s red blood cells for its growth and development.  This is the most common type of anemia in pregnancy.

B-12 deficiency is when there is a low level of B-12 which is important for making red blood cells and protein.  If you are a vegan mom, you may find yourself with this type.  It is found in eggs, milk, poultry, meat.

Folate deficiency can inhibit the production of red blood cells.  It is a B vitamin that is water soluble.  Folic acid is the synthetic version of folate and is not as easily digestible and folate.  You can find folate in dark leafy green vegetables, beets, Brewer’s yeast, liver, etc.  It is a common deficiency because the modern diet of processed foods, though supplemented with folic acid, it is not easily usable as the folate found in fresh unprocessed foods.  Your baby needs this to prevent birth defects of the brain and spinal cord.

Using Food as Medicine

Nutrition is most important in pregnancy.  Food can be used to prevent deficiency and to balance any deficiency in mild cases. If you are in need of iron-rich foods, then you can look to dark leafy greens, beets, legumes, beans, kelp, meats, poultry, liver and more.  For iron to be absorbed well, vitamin C rich food should be paired together or supplementing with vitamin C.   Cooking in an iron skillet helps increase the iron in your meal.  A favorite plant based supplement for iron that I took for all three of my pregnancies was Floradix (I am not affiliated with them) or if you are gluten sensitive their Floravital.  It is an herbal iron supplement that is non-constipating.

There are foods and supplements that can inhibit the absorption of food.  The use of antacids or other alkalis will diminish iron absorption.  These are sometimes commonly used in pregnancy if you are affected by heartburn.  Coffee and black tea can inhibit absorption as well.  Calcium can inhibit iron absorption so it is important to try avoid taking a calcium supplement at the time of iron supplement or with your iron-rich meal.  Iron absorption is a slow process and takes about 2-4 hours for the body to absorb iron so you could take iron supplement at separate meal time than your calcium.

Folate-rich foods that can boost your folate spinach, kale, beet greens, beets, chart, organ meats, brewer’s yeast.  Bean sprouts of mung bean, lentils, and soy are really good sources of folate.  B-12 can be supplemented with a sublingual B-12 or shots every three months during pregnancy.

Eat Well, Be Well

So the pattern as you can seen for a well-nourished pregnancy is eat to well-balanced meals.  Make sure your meals are mostly fresh whole ingredients.  Eat less processed foods.  It really pays to understand nutrition and how it affects your pregnancy and your baby’s health.  Learn, have fun with it, ask for help.  Eat well, be well.

Sources:  https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P02428  Staying Healthy with Nutrition by Elson M. Haas, M.D.

New Holistic Postpartum Care Offering!

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I am so thrilled to introduce you to the newest Ebb & Flow offering. Let’s get together and see if this plan is right for you. I know it is worth it. It’s  known in many societies the new mother is not valued. We do not teach new mothers to accept that they are valuable and though countless women before us have birthed, every single one is special and is your own experience. What does postpartum support look like for you? What do you wish it was for you? In the post before I talked about the support I provide mom’s immediately after the birth and in the 5 weeks to follow.  Massage in the home using hot stones to warm and pull back the pelvis area and lessons on self-massage that you can practice daily. IMG_2524.PNG

Nourishing meal preparation in the home to encourage your body’s healing.  IMG_2519

When your body is ready, rejuvenating makko ho stretching. This is about mom and helping her replenish, nourish her baby, and be nourished. Let’s talk about how I can help you feel nurtured in the #4thtrimester.

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What do Buffalo mom’s feel is their ideal birth experience?

 

Deidre M. Medina, LMT 140 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201 (716)292-6113 dee@ebbandflowbirth.com

Holding Space – The First Hour


Birth workers have long known the importance of holding the space during a IMG_1091woman’s labor.  The goal has always been to make sure she feels safe and able to be vulnerable, to give in to the waves of birth without judgement, and as little interference as possible.  The benefits of letting her body guide her are numerous.  Holding the space, however, does not end with the birth.  It should continue on after the birth.  This is the moment the family has been waiting for.

Allowing the mother, partner, and baby to adjust and become one is so important.  There are physiological and emotional needs being met in that first hour.  It is sometimes a struggle for the birth worker not to swoop in busily doing this and that.  Really, what mom needs is a moment to allow her body and mind to adjust and take in what just happened.  She is coming out of birthing mode.  For some this may mean holding her baby and looking into baby’s eyes and others they may need time before connecting to baby both are fine.  Ina May Gaskin wrote in her book Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth, of the first hour – “We have no routine that interfere with the euphoria that is present in the birth room…They are falling in love.  We enjoy witnessing this process while being conscious not to interrupt it.”

Stepping into the background and letting the family’s natural rhythm unfold.  Respecting and honoring that first hour is the best thing that those in the birth room can do for the family.  As long as mom and baby are in good health, less interference is only for the best and can affect that family circle’s rhythm for the best for the long run.